A joint Fermilab/SLAC publication

Voting open for 2018 Global Physics Photowalk

08/27/18

Help choose the winning images in this international science photography competition.

Detail of the forward radial wire chamber formed part of the H1 detector that took data at the HERA collider at DESY.
Rosemary Wilson, a 2015 Global Physics Photowalk winner

Voting is now open for the 2018 Global Physics Photowalk competition, offered by the Interactions Collaboration of physics laboratories around the world.

Through the eyes of hundreds of amateur and professional photographers, the Global Physics Photowalk offers a rare glimpse into the people, engineering and technology behind the science at 17 participating labs.

This summer, each laboratory invited photographers on a behind-the-scenes tour and held a local competition to pick the top images to come out of the experience. The winners have advanced to the global competition, which starts today. A public online vote will determine the top three, while a panel of expert photographers and scientists will also choose their three favorites.

The Interactions Collaboration invites you to pick five top choices at www.interactions.org/photowalk. Voting closes at 11:59 p.m. Pacific time on Sunday, September 16.

Winners will be announced on Sunday, October 1, at the international Association of Science-Technology Centers annual conference in Hartford, Connecticut.

The competition is supported by the Royal Photographic Society and ASTC.

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