A joint Fermilab/SLAC publication
latest news
02/19/20
CERN

The measurements are consistent with predictions for “normal” matter and pave the way for future precision studies.

02/12/20
KEK

The Hyper-K project has officially started, with operations scheduled to begin in 2027.

02/11/20
Fermilab

Award-winning engineer and physicist Alvin Tollestrup died on February 9 of cancer.

02/11/20
Fermilab

Completing the Technical Design Report required running enormous amounts of simulations, vetting the data recording and analysis process and ultimately making decisions about how to build the project.

Reina Reyes looks like science

02/18/20

Reina Reyes made headlines for her research at Princeton testing Einstein’s theory of general relativity; now she’s home in the Philippines, using her physics background to make her mark in different ways.

02/13/20

The reverse science fair

A school invited physicists from Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory to present their science for judgment by elementary students.

02/11/20

What we know about dark matter

Although scientists have yet to find the spooky stuff, they aren’t completely in the dark.

02/04/20

On background

Physicists deal with background in their experiments in two ways: by reducing it and by rejecting it.

01/28/20

Fine-tuning versus naturalness

When observed parameters seem like they must be finely tuned to fit a theory, some physicists accept it as coincidence. Others want to keep digging.

01/23/20

When kids interview scientists

Science Storytellers brings together two groups of innately curious individuals: scientists and children.

01/21/20

The other dark matter candidate

As technology improves, scientists discover new ways to search for theorized dark matter particles called axions.

01/16/20

Drag racing and black hole physics

The first undergraduate on the Event Horizon Telescope to receive junior collaborator status thrives in the unknown.

01/14/20

The persevering physicist

To both understand the universe and improve equity, inclusion and diversity in physics, Brian Beckford looks to one word: respect.