A joint Fermilab/SLAC publication

LHC Page 1—decoded!

03/19/10
Today the CERN Bulletin decodes the LHC'S Page 1 using a display from this morning's energy ramp to 3.5 TeV.

Today the CERN Bulletin decodes the LHC'S Page 1 using a display from this morning's energy ramp to 3.5 TeV.

Earlier today the Large Hadron Collider ramped up to a new energy level of 3.5 TeV, and may be only weeks away from colliding particles at this record-breaking energy. As things progress during this exciting period, you can keep track of the changes at the LHC with the same LHC Page 1 display the experts use to monitor the accelerator.

LHC accelerator engineers and physicists use Page 1 to display the overall status of the accelerator. The page changes throughout the day with the changing activity of the machine. LHC operators update the page to incorporate comments on the current task and operations mode such as preparing for beam, testing an accelerator system, or providing experimental collisions.

Today’s CERN Bulletin offers a quick guide to understanding Page 1 using a display from last night's ramp to 3.5 TeV. The Bulletin describes the main features of the display, including the status of the overall accelerator and the energy and intensity of each beam of protons.

For a more technical walkthrough, visit the LHC portal’s explanation of Page 1. The Portal breaks down two other display examples; one for beam circulation and dump and a second from an injection test. A glossary helps translate the acronyms and shorthand used by the LHC's operators in the CERN Control Centre.

This concludes our three-part LHC decoded series. Earlier this week, we described how physicists at the LHC display particle collisions at the CMS and ATLAS experiments.

by Daisy Yuhas

Latest news articles
01/21/20
New York Times

Decades ago, Armenian scientists built a high-elevation trap to catch and study cosmic rays. Physics has mostly moved on, but the station persists—a ghost observatory with a skeleton crew.

01/17/20
Science News

The United States has taken a key step toward building its first new particle collider in decades.

01/11/20
Gizmodo

In the study, physicists concluded that Type Ia supernovae might not be the standard candles that astronomers initially thought.

01/11/20
New York Times

The astronomer missed her Nobel Prize. But she now has a whole new observatory to her name.