symmetry magazine

dimensions of particle physics

dimensions of particle physics

A joint Fermilab/SLAC publication

 

breaking

August 2008

  • August 28, 2008
    breaking: Dark matter illuminated
    A new study of an immense cosmic collision has provided confirming evidence for dark matter. The new results confirm those obtained from the 2006 study of the Bullet Cluster, providing a clear view of dark matter, separated from ordinary baryons.
  • August 27, 2008
    breaking: Can you predict Nobel Prize winners by counting citations?
    In a recently posted analysis of the bibliometrics surrounding the physics and chemistry Nobel Prize winners and nominees of the past 106 years, the answer turns out to be no.
  • August 26, 2008
    breaking: GLAST Observatory renamed for Fermi, reveals entire gamma-ray sky
    The US Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA announced today that the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) has revealed its first all-sky map in gamma rays. The onboard Large Area Telescope's (LAT) all-sky image--which shows the glowing gas of the Milky Way, blinking pulsars, and a flaring galaxy billions of light-years away--was created using only 95 hours of "first light" observations, compared with past missions which took years to produce a similar image.
  • August 25, 2008
    breaking: Free online: Full documentation for the Large Hadron Collider
    Want to read every single technical detail of the design and construction of the Large Hadron Collider and its six detectors? The whole shebang--seven reports totalling 1600 pages, with contributions from 8000 scientists and engineers--is available online.
  • August 22, 2008
    breaking: The Paul Revere of pulses
    The timing of a complicated device like a linear accelerator depends on a synchronizing pulse. But what kind of pulse is best? And is the type of pulse used at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center merely a historical accident?
  • August 21, 2008
    breaking: Physicists shine light on the human brain
    In the new issue of Science Notes, Amber Dance describes how scientists at Stanford Linear Accelerator are using a beam of bright light to look for metal deposits in the human brain.
  • August 20, 2008
    breaking: The safety of switching on the Large Hadron Collider
    A new viewpoint essay by Michael Peskin provides a clear summary of the technical arguments showing there is negligible risk of the Large Hadron Collider producing dangerous microscopic black holes.
  • August 19, 2008
    breaking: ArgoNeuTs see first events
    A group of scientists known as the ArgoNeuTs--a word play on the Argonauts, the heroes of Greek mythology--have overcome the first hurdle in their scientific quest to observe neutrinos.
  • August 18, 2008
    breaking: Can science be funny?
    I was skeptical about whether a self-style "science comedian" could hold a stand-up for a full-length set, but Brian Malow gave the audience what they came for, and showed science can be funny to non-scientists.
  • August 15, 2008
    breaking: Twirl yourself dizzy in a virtual LHC
    Peter McCready has posted stunning 360-degree images that let you swoop around the big detectors at the Large Hadron Collider. Careful not to make yourself sick!
  • August 14, 2008
    breaking: On course for a convincing supernova
    The historic failure of supernovae simulations to achieve robust explosions is now being treated with models that focus on magnetic field effects. A summer student at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center is working to make the supernovae explode in the computations of a computer.
  • August 13, 2008
    breaking: New issue of symmetry available
    In the August 2008 issue of symmetry, read about the three-pronged approach to particle physics discoveries recently announced in a strategic planning document; ArgoNeuT, a liquid-argon-based detector looking for neutrinos; and the symmetry collection of physics-based license plates.
  • August 11, 2008
    breaking: LHC test successful
    CERN just released an update announcing that they successfully completed the first beam injection test.
  • August 8, 2008
    breaking: First protons injected into the LHC
    The Large Hadron Collider saw its first protons today, around 6:30 p.m. at CERN (12:30 p.m. US EDT), as scientists conducted the first beam injection test in one section of the collider.
  • August 8, 2008
    breaking: Most everything you wanted to know about, well, everything....
    If you always wanted to know more about science but don't have time to go back to school or visit your neighborhood laboratory, Fermilab has an online library made just for you.
  • August 7, 2008
    breaking: CERN first beam due September 10, 2008
    CERN officially announced today that the first attempt to circulate a beam through the Large Hadron Collider will be made on September 10, 2008.
  • August 7, 2008
    breaking: Amateur finds new cosmic object
    A Dutch schoolteacher with no previous interest in science has identified a new type of cosmic object. The object is a green blob of gas that was once powered by a quasar now gone dim. Professional astronomers confirm that object is one of a kind.
  • August 6, 2008
    breaking: Particle physics is a dirty, dirty job
    Being a particle physicist doesn't conjure up images of getting your hands dirty. But in tasks that rival those featured in a recent spate of television programs about the world's dirtiest jobs, neutrino physicist Mark Vagins has a lot to contend with working underground on the Super-Kamiokande experiment in Japan.
  • August 5, 2008
    breaking: Preparing the next generation of neutrino physicists
    Georgia Karagiori and Matt Taub want to build a giant, super-intense laser with a 100-kilometer beamline to detect "relic neutrinos" from 14 billion years ago. This cosmic neutrino spectrometer could some day explain how the universe evolved two or thee seconds after the big bang.
  • August 4, 2008
    breaking: Fermilab zooms in on the Higgs boson
    Scientists working on the CDF and DZero experiments at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory are entering Higgs territory. On Sunday, the two groups reported at a conference in Pennsylvania that for the first time their results directly restrict the allowed mass range for the elusive Higgs boson.

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