symmetry magazine

dimensions of particle physics

dimensions of particle physics

A joint Fermilab/SLAC publication

 

breaking

July 2008

  • July 18, 2008
    breaking: Packing metal in fangs, claws and jaws
    Scorpions, crabs, worms and other creatures have metal atoms in their claws, jaws and fangs that make those structures significantly stronger and longer lasting. They're being surveyed with high-energy particle techniques.
  • July 16, 2008
    breaking: DAMA result is not "normal" dark matter
    The intriguing signal from the DAMA/LIBRA experiment in Italy has been ruled out as a sign of "normal" dark matter, according to new experimental data by the CoGeNT collaboration.
  • July 15, 2008
    breaking: Quick thinking helps experiment stay afloat
    The flood waters crept up. The lights went out. Yasar Onel and about a dozen of his students were not about to let angry Midwest weather wash away the University of Iowa's part in the world's largest physics experiment.
  • July 14, 2008
    breaking: ANTARES neutrino telescope complete
    The latest generation of neutrino telescopes uses vast bodies of salt water, fresh water, or ice as the medium for detecting neutrinos. The ANTARES experiment, which recently announced that it has completed construction, is the salt water version, based at the bottom of the Mediterranean Sea.
  • July 11, 2008
    breaking: It's official: Dark energy is in the dictionary
    It joins air quotes, edamame, dirty bomb, malware, mondagreen, and wing nut in the new edition of Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary. The physicist who coined the term says, "About time!"
  • July 9, 2008
    breaking: Physicists discover new particle: the bottom-most "bottomonium"
    Collaborators on the BaBar experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center have detected and measured, for the first time after a 30-year search, the lowest energy particle of the bottomonium family, called the eta-sub-b.
  • July 9, 2008
    breaking: Dispelling science stereotypes one single at a time
    Particle astrophysicist Mark Jackson stood in the swanky Museum of Contemporary Art surrounded by many of the city's rich and influential. While few people likely understood what he does for a living--study black holes and primordial ooze left over from the big bang--they did understand his nonacademic title: One of Chicago's top 10 bachelors.
  • July 8, 2008
    breaking: Super B factories: competing proposals
    A next-generation type of particle collider called a Super B factory would push the intensity frontier to search for ultra-rare decays and perhaps find missing elements that go beyond the Standard Model of particle physics.
  • July 7, 2008
    breaking: American Metric
    The National Institute of Standards and Technology recently published its 8th edition of the English language SI Units Brochure: a complete guide to the International System of Units: now the metric system of choice for the US. Rush out and pick up your "Americanized" brochure to get the scoop on which units made the cut, which ones didn't, plus how to spell "meter" and "liter" the American way.
  • July 3, 2008
    breaking: A new era of synchrotron science at SLAC: PEP-X
    By capitalizing on hardware and infrastructure already in place, a new synchrotron storage ring project, "PEP-X," would catapult SLAC even further beyond the research capabilities available at existing photon science laboratories.
  • July 2, 2008
    breaking: GLAST spacecraft powered up and sending data
    After their journey into the cold reaches of space, instruments on the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope have been woken up ready to begin operations. Data from the Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of two instruments aboard GLAST, is arriving at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center’s Instrument Science Operations Center where it will be monitored, processed, and distributed to the rest of the science team worldwide.
  • July 2, 2008
    breaking: GLAST launch celebration
    GLAST team members celebrated the successful launch of the gamma-ray telescope at a party at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center.
  • July 1, 2008
    breaking: What do the DAMA dark matter results mean?
    Might the recent dark matter results from the DAMA collaboration be a sign of low-mass dark matter particles, and not in contradiction with other dark matter experiments?

June 2008

  • June 30, 2008
    breaking: Dispelling science stereotypes one single at a time
    Particle astrophysicist Mark Jackson stood in the swanky Museum of Contemporary Art surrounded by many of the city's rich and influential. While few people likely understood what he does for a living--study black holes and primordial ooze left over from the big bang--they did understand his nonacademic title: One of Chicago's top 10 bachelors.
  • June 30, 2008
    breaking: The LHC as a massive grid computer
    From one angle the Large Hadron Collider is a particle collider; but from another, it's a massive grid computer with the collider as its CPU, according to a rich and highly readable overview by Tim O'Brien.
  • June 28, 2008
    breaking: Diploma mill proprietors plead guilty
    Diploma mills, which issue false university qualifications for money, suffered a major blow with one of the largest cartels pleading guilty to charges. George Gollin discussed the problem in symmetry in 2006 and the New York Times now reports on the results of indictments.
  • June 27, 2008
    breaking: US House and Senate pass bill with more science funding
    Last night, the US Senate voted to approve an emergency funding bill including $62.5 million for the Department of Energy's Office of Science. The funding will allow Fermilab to stop its involuntary layoff program that had been scheduled for next month.
  • June 27, 2008
    breaking: SLAC, Lawrence Berkeley Lab, and J-Lab join SCOAP3
    Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and Jefferson Lab have joined the SCOAP3 consortium, which is developing a new model for funding peer-reviewed journals.
  • June 26, 2008
    breaking: US LHC construction declared formally complete
    The decade-long project to help build CERN's LHC accelerator, and the ATLAS and CMS detectors, culminated yesterday (June 25) when Dr. Raymond L. Orbach, Department of Energy under secretary for science and director of the Office of Science, announced the formal completion of the US LHC construction project.
  • June 26, 2008
    breaking: A quick, easy way to grill candidates on science policy
    Sixteen prominent science and engineering organizations have sent a questionnaire to every Congressional candidate across the nation, asking where they stand on seven key areas of science and technology policy. And they've made it easy for you to do the same.

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